Tuesday, January 16, 2007

300 years ago today

What follows isn't knitting or stitching but just some random recent thoughts on the history of where I'm from
300 years ago today, the original Scottish Parliament passed the Act of Union which joined Scotland to England and Wales as Great Britain under one Monarch but with separate legal and education systems and a independent Church of Scotland.
At school, I learned about the Act and the turbulent and rebellion filled time which followed and I was encouraged to be proud of my country's history inspite of the many failures. I do sometimes wonder how things might have been if the Act of Union had never happened and if an independent Scotland would have thrived. Or perhaps the hard times are what made Scotland the nation it is today. I guess the world would have been different for many countries as so many Scots left to seek better times elsewhere as times got tough at home.
Today I choose to remember that we make our own decisions about how history affects our future. In the past, Scotland has let itself dwell on past injustices and how a now 300 year old act, which many were opposed to, caused the country to feel resentful about its bigger neighbour. The best thing that any country can to do is to look forward to a better future and ensure that its talented people are helped to achieve their potential and great traditions are preserved so that future generations can appreciate the country they live in, not forced to leave for whatever reason.
Today I am proud to be Scottish but also British. It makes for a interesting bag of different experiences.

8 comments:

Von said...

It's definitely a mixed bag, isn't it. Guess I have to be grateful for all the Scots who emigrated to N. America, especially those who happen to be my ancestors. :D (Plus those from the Lincolnshire area of England!)

Seahorse said...

That's a great post Paula. I wondered what your feelings were after hearing all the opposing voices in news progs recently. Your view is an awful lot more mature and considered than some of the so called experts I've been listening to!

Shannon L. said...

I love your look on things. It makes sense. And thanks for the mini history lesson. It's rather fascinating - I'm off to search for more info :)

lena-lou said...

Paula, I really like your view on this matter...being married to a Scottish man (and his family) who really do not like the English because of the history between the countries this is such a refreshing change to hear...I am your friend :-))

stitcherw said...

Interesting history, I like your perspective on it. I visited Scotland many years ago, but would like to go again sometime, what I saw was very pretty.
Sue

Josa Craft said...

I like your point of view. Here in America, we were on the winning end of this...so many former Scottish people and their descendants are now Americans. We would have missed out! But it is was hard and bitter time, from what I remember learning in school. It sure took the U.S. many years to get over our feud with the British! I just think of the many ways both countries (and others) have contributed to our culture in America!!! My grandfather is half English (Downs), but also French and German. On the other side of the family, we have Irish and German, but alas, no Scottish. =( I had an English friend who used to shake her head at how we are all such a crazy mix of nationalities here! Stop by if you're ever in America...Iowa is really cold this time of year, but we are all really friendly! =)

Love and hugs from across the sea,

catandturtle said...

Thank you so much for the spot of history. I have both English and Scottish in me and it was really cool to read about that. Cheers. Ann.

TutleyMutley said...

I'm a Celt through and through with ancestors from West Wales, and the South West of England, yet I've lost so much history and language - I can only speak but a little welsh. I get so miserable when I dwell on past misjustices - the tragedies that happened to the crofters, the indignities the welsh suffered, the irish 'troubles' and on and on. I just hope we can all live together. Exactly what you said so much more articulately in that last paragraph.